4 Steps to Finishing Your Novel: Taking a Sledgehammer to Your Shiny New Draft


I love the idea of this. Now if I could just finish the shiny new draft so I can take a sledge hammer to it….

Five Warning Signs Your Story Needs Revision


I’ve found myself a little annoyed at some stories that I’ve been reading lately and this pretty much sums it up. And when I mean some, I include most of mine and not yours Rachel J Lewis. SMH – *walks away muttering* so much to learn, so little time…

Kristen Lamb's Blog

Screen Shot 2013-03-22 at 11.38.45 AM Original image via Jenny Downing Flikr Creative Commons

We can have the best story ideas in the world, but to be blunt? There’s a lot to be said for delivery. While these problems might seem picky, there are some fundamental errors that can weaken the writing. If our writing loses power, this can become distressing or distracting to readers.

Many readers (not being editors or professional writers) might not be able to articulate specifically why they lost interest in a story, but often the answer is simple. It can be an accumulation of the small things. The little foxes spoil the vine.

Most of us make one or more of these errors, especially when we’re new. Hey, that’s called “being NEW.” No one is born with the natural ability to write brilliant, perfect novels coded into their DNA. It takes time and practice, so give yourself permission to make…

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Reading to Write


Good advice. I have often found myself drawn back to authors that I love. Unfortunately, it doesn’t solve my time problems. *sigh*

Quoth The Wordsmith

663092_26111643 You’ll often hear that in order to write, you need to read. Many prominent authors stick by it and advise aspiring writers to make a practice of always having a piece of literature on the go. It’s good advice, as long as you know that if you are reading to write, you need to look at the writing that you are reading differently. Here’s how I do it:

-Accept and note the areas that you have trouble with, whether they include dialogue, structure, characterization, setting, etc. Know and embrace the fact that you have room to improve.

-Pick a story or a book (or a few!) that really made an impression on you in terms of style, tone, and connection. It should be something that you don’t mind reading again, and that you would give a glowing review.

-Read the story slowly. Take your time. Figure out how that story…

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